• Chloe Mepham BSc

Laughter as Medicine

Updated: Nov 17


It took me thirteen years to start laughing again. It wasn’t that I didn’t have a sense of humour. It wasn’t that I didn’t understand jokes. It was because I was medicated, and in addition to not experiencing the negative emotions of depression and anxiety. I unfortunately didn’t experience the positive emotions of joy and excitement.


Since ceasing medicinal support for my mental health, I have found my self-care strategies have supported me to deal with the negatives. They will always be there for everyone. However, I have been able to experience the positive emotions. And for me . . . that is beyond worth it.


It’s motivational, it relieves stress, and it encourages joy!


As such I have set myself a goal. A goal to laugh at least once daily. I am expanding this goal to encourage others to laugh too.


In the same way that if you behave negatively, it affects others, whose mood then affects others and yet more others and so on. This is a phenomenon called the Ripple Effect. I am determined to turn this around with my new goal. So, I will laugh at my unfunny jokes. I will make those I am close to laugh at how unfunny my jokes are. And then who knows? Maybe one day I’ll be able to crack a funny one.


In the meantime, I’m going to fake it until I make it! There are so many positive effects for humour and I encourage the world during these strange times to take control of what they can. You can’t control others, but you can control when and how you laugh!


Have a humour filled day!


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